Do travel trailers have to stop at weigh stations?

In this blog post, we will answer the question: “Do travel trailers have to stop at weigh stations?” We will talk about the states where travel trailers are required to stop. We will also list the states with their weight laws for recreational vehicles and trucks. By the end of this blog, you will get an idea if you are required to stop at weigh stations.

Do travel trailers have to stop at weigh stations?

The answer to this question is Yes and No. Stopping at weigh stations depends on which state you plan on traveling to or crossing. In most of the states in the US, you are not required to stop at weigh stations. However, there are certain states where you must stop at a weigh station if the GCWR of your travel trailers is more than 10,000 pounds or more.

The Department of Transportation verifies the weight of the vehicle and determines if you are overloaded or not. You will come across weight stations on the highway when you are towing your travel trailer. The easiest way is to be on the safe side and make sure that your travel trailer is not more than 10,000 pounds.

You will also come across a port of entry at the border of each state, these are weight stations. Although the laws are different according to the state, the rule for commercial trucks is the same. Any commercial truck that is over 10,000 pounds is required to stop at every weigh station that comes their way. Most of these weigh stations are at the border between two states.

Where to stop if the trailer exceeds 10,000 pounds

Some states have rules where you are required to stop only if the trailer exceeds 10,000 pounds. Be it a travel trailer, an RV, or any type of motorhome. If your vehicle weighs more than 10,000 pounds or more, you must stop at these states to get a clearance check. Here are the states listed below.

  • Arkansas
  • Georgia
  • Iowa
  • Louisiana
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Nevada
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Rhode Island
  • New Jersey
  • Wisconsin

Failing to stop at these weight stations, especially when you are overloaded can result in heavy fines. The driver has no choice but to stop at a weigh station to avoid such situations. In the other states, different laws abide by. These rules can also change over time, you can check for this information online at the state transportation department website before heading out.

Weight station laws as per the state

Here are the weight station laws according to the state. Note: These laws can change accordingly.

Alaska: Trucks that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Arizona: Travel trailers, semi-trailers, and commercial trucks that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Arkansas: Commercial trucks, passenger vehicles, and agricultural vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Hawaii: Trucks that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Indiana: Trucks that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Iowa: All vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Kentucky: Commercial vehicles and agricultural vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Louisiana: Passenger vehicles, commercial vehicles, and agricultural vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Maryland: Commercial buses exceeding 16 passengers, commercial vehicles, and agricultural vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Massachusetts: Commercial trucks, passenger vehicles, and agricultural vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Michigan: Vehicles that are moving agricultural produce with dual rear wheels and dual rear wheel trucks with more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop. Tractors, semitrailers, and construction equipment vehicles are also required to stop.

Minnesota: All vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Nevada: Agricultural vehicles, passenger vehicles, single trailers, and commercial vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

North Dakota: Recreational vehicles (RVs) are not required to stop. The rest of the vehicles that are more than 10,000 points are required to stop.

Rhode Island: Trucks that are more than 10,000 pounds and agricultural vehicles are required to stop.

Washington: Any vehicle with a gross weight of more than 10,000 pounds is required to stop.

Wyoming: Vehicles that are more than 10,000 pounds are required to stop.

Those are the states where you are required to stop if your travel trailer or vehicle weighs more than 10,000 pounds. The other states have laws that need to be taken into consideration. Be sure to keep your weight light and make sure that your vehicle will weigh lesser than 10,000 pounds after all the passengers are accommodated.

The states listed below have the following rules

California: Commercial vehicles must stop for an inspection of weight, equipment, and size. The California highway patrol will also check for smoke emissions.

Alabama: You might be required to weigh your truck with portable scales if necessary.

Colorado: Vehicles, trailers, and all types of haulers are required to stop if the gross weight is more than 26,000 pounds.

Connecticut: Regardless of the weight, all commercial vehicles are required to stop.

Delaware: Department of public safety has the right to stop and check a vehicle if they are overloaded.

Florida: Motor vehicles, agricultural vehicles, storage vehicles, and any type of vehicle that is transporting or carrying any form of cargo are required to stop. This also includes food transportation, horticultural, livestock, travel trailers, and camping trailers. Only private passenger vehicles are exempted from the list.

Illinois: Officers have the right to stop and check vehicles that are exceeding weight limits. This also includes recreational vehicles. The same rules apply to Kansas.

Maine: Officers have the right to check and examine the vehicle and the cargo if suspected.

Mississippi: Any authorized compliance officer or highway patrol has the right to check vehicles if they are overloaded.

Montana: New RVs that are taken to a dealer and any vehicle with more than 8,000 pounds are required to stop.

New Hampshire: Vehicles that are directed to a weight station for weighing purposes will need to stop.

New York: When asked to stop at fixed weight stations for inspection purposes, the driver must abide by the rules.

New Jersey: Any vehicle that weighs 10,001 pounds or more is required to stop.

New Mexico: Trucks that weigh more than 26,000 pounds are required to stop.

North Carolina: A driver must comply with the rules when they are asked to stop at a particular weight station.

Oklahoma: Rightful officers from the Oklahoma Tax Commission or any sheriff have the right to stop any vehicle and check the weight either by a fixed scale or a portable scale.

Oregon: Every vehicle that weighs more than 26,000 pounds is required to stop.

Pennsylvania: Travel trailers, large RVs, and passenger vehicles including trucks can be stopped for inspection regardless of the size.

South Carolina: Officers have the right to stop a vehicle if there is any reason for suspicion. You might be required to stop and check the weight either by a fixed scale or a portable scale.

South Dakota: Trucks and agricultural vehicles that weigh more than 8,000 pounds are required to stop.

Tennessee: There are weighing stations that are available throughout the state and you might be required to stop and check if the vehicle is overloaded.

Texas: All commercial vehicles are required to stop when asked by a police officer or a sign.

Utah: Any law enforcement officer has the right to ask you to stop any vehicle. The same law applies to Vermont.

Virginia: Trucks that are more than 7,500 pounds are required to stop.

Wyoming: Vehicles can be stopped for random inspection.

The easiest way out is to play it safe. There are several laws according to each state and these laws are also subject to change if necessary. Traveling below a weight of 10,000 pounds is always a good option. The best thing to do is to stop at a weigh station irrespective of the weight you are carrying. This will help you to understand the rules and regulations for each state.

Conclusion

In this blog post, we have answered the question: “Do travel trailers have to stop at weigh stations?” We have talked about the different states where travel trailers are required to stop. We have also listed the states with their weight laws for recreational vehicles and trucks. Do let us know in the comments below if there are any other rules for weight stations.

Citations

https://www.upack.com/articles/do-rental-trucks-have-to-stop-at-weigh-stations
https://camperfront.com/do-rvs-stop-at-weigh-stations/

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